thingsofthewild
sharkhugger:

This photo was taken by Peri Paleracio, in the Philippines. The whale shark was found by a scuba diver, still alive and trying to swim. Its pectoral and ventral fins were cut off by poachers who sell shark fins at a premium for the Chinese delicacy, shark fin soup. Locals, with the help of local government, pulled the still-struggling shark to shore where it died the next day. Here a local woman mourns its miserable fate.This photo was named “most compelling image” of 2010 in honor of the UN’s International Year of Biodiversity.This is not just something caused by Chinese fishermen, it is a global problem. Shark Fin soup is sold all over the world, even in the UK. Please support the fight against shark finning. * Spread the word.* Share photos and stories such as this.* Sign petitions. This one is petitioning the UN for a worldwide ban on shark finning: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/532/581/725/?cid=FB_TAF* Write to local restaurants serving the dish: Bite-Back Shark & Marine Conservation have a celebrity-signed template letter and map listing restaurants in the UK selling shark fin soup. Find them here:http://www.bite-back.com/shark-sightings-map/Most of these things can be done with such minimal effort, just a few seconds, or few minutes, of your time. Collectively our voices DO make a difference. Countries and cities have successfully implemented bans on the sale of shark fin products as a result of individuals coming together to make a stink about it.Nudi x(shared with the photographer’s permission)https://www.facebook.com/peri.paleracio

sharkhugger:

This photo was taken by Peri Paleracio, in the Philippines. The whale shark was found by a scuba diver, still alive and trying to swim. Its pectoral and ventral fins were cut off by poachers who sell shark fins at a premium for the Chinese delicacy, shark fin soup. Locals, with the help of local government, pulled the still-struggling shark to shore where it died the next day. Here a local woman mourns its miserable fate.

This photo was named “most compelling image” of 2010 in honor of the UN’s International Year of Biodiversity.

This is not just something caused by Chinese fishermen, it is a global problem. Shark Fin soup is sold all over the world, even in the UK. 

Please support the fight against shark finning. 
* Spread the word.
* Share photos and stories such as this.
* Sign petitions. This one is petitioning the UN for a worldwide ban on shark finning: 
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/532/581/725/?cid=FB_TAF
* Write to local restaurants serving the dish: Bite-Back Shark & Marine Conservation have a celebrity-signed template letter and map listing restaurants in the UK selling shark fin soup. Find them here:http://www.bite-back.com/shark-sightings-map/

Most of these things can be done with such minimal effort, just a few seconds, or few minutes, of your time. Collectively our voices DO make a difference. Countries and cities have successfully implemented bans on the sale of shark fin products as a result of individuals coming together to make a stink about it.

Nudi x

(shared with the photographer’s permission)
https://www.facebook.com/peri.paleracio

thingsofthewild
thingsofthewild:

currentsinbiology:

Baby corals and fish smell their way to the best home
New research suggests that baby fish and coral larvae smell their way to neighborhoods where the living is good. Scents emitted by certain species of adult corals draw fish and coral larvae to healthy reefs, while the noxious odor of out-of-control seaweed drives them away from damaged ecosystems.

“These are fantastic results,” says Jelle Atema, a chemical and behavioral ecologist at Boston University. The findings demonstrate “dramatic differences” in coral or fish behavior, he says, and “how important chemical signals are in regulating the interactions between corals and seaweeds and fishes.”

 Photograph: Jim Maragos/AP 

GUYS.

thingsofthewild:

currentsinbiology:

Baby corals and fish smell their way to the best home

New research suggests that baby fish and coral larvae smell their way to neighborhoods where the living is good. Scents emitted by certain species of adult corals draw fish and coral larvae to healthy reefs, while the noxious odor of out-of-control seaweed drives them away from damaged ecosystems.

“These are fantastic results,” says Jelle Atema, a chemical and behavioral ecologist at Boston University. The findings demonstrate “dramatic differences” in coral or fish behavior, he says, and “how important chemical signals are in regulating the interactions between corals and seaweeds and fishes.”

 Photograph: Jim Maragos/AP

GUYS.

thingsofthewild

scienceyoucanlove:

Mola Mola: The Weirdest Fish in the Ocean?

By Craig Leisher

When it hatches, a Mola mola is the size of a pinhead but will grow to be the heaviest bony fish in the ocean—and the weirdest.

The weirdness begins with the eggs. A female Mola mola or ocean sunfish produces more eggs than any other vertebrate on earth.

One modest-sized female had an estimate 300 million eggs inside her.

At birth, the baby fish are protected by a star-shaped transparent covering that looks like someone put an alien head inside of a Christmas ornament—albeit a very small only a tenth of an inch across.

Even as a baby, the Mola mola has its parents’ surprised look with the wide eye and open mouth.

The baby will grow fast. Very fast. One individual in the Monterey Bay Aquarium gained 822 pounds in just 15 months (almost 2 pounds a day).

By the time it is an adolescent, the fish will have not tail fin, no ribs, a fused spine, and will swim by flapping its dorsal fin on the top and its anal fin on the bottom.

It will look like a giant swimming head.

Mola molas spend much of their lives in the open ocean chasing the sea jellie (a.k.a. jellyfish) they often eat. They have unusual teeth that are fused together inside a mouth they never close.

They are called the ocean sunfish because they are frequently seen catching rays on the ocean surface. One reason they float on the surface is so birds can peck out the parasites off their skin.

And they have a lot of parasites. More than 50 species of parasites have been recorded on and inside Mola molas.

Like sharks and rays, the female are far bigger than the males. The heaviest Mola mola on record is a female caught in 1996 that weighed 5,071 pounds (2,300 kg).

Here a picture from 1910 of a Mola mola that weighed an estimate 3,500 pounds. (1,600 kg).

The huge decline in shark populations and far greater numbers of sea jellies in the ocean mean Mola molas now have fewer predators and more food. The 21th century looks like a good one if you’re a Mola mola.

But who knows for how long. Given that they are one of the few large fish in the ocean that are doing well, don’t be surprised if someone gives the Mola Mola a catchy new name and starts selling them globally, just as marketers did for the Slimehead (Orange Roughy) and the Patagonia toothfish (Chilean sea bass).

You can see a Mola molas at a Nature Conservancy-supported marine protected area near Bali, Indonesia. The Mola mola congregate near Nusa Penida Island, and during the peak of mola season in October, there is a great chance of seeing the weirdness (and the parasites) of the Mola mola firsthand.

- See more at: http://blog.nature.org/science/2014/04/02/mola-mola-the-weirdest-fish-in-the-ocean/#sthash.J4zj7wCj.dpuf

thelovelyseas

thelovelyseas:

Shark week is my favorite week ever but like c’mon now natgeo and discovery.

Instead of shows like “crazed killer sharks!!” maybe we could actually do important shows like idk -

Humans kill 100 million sharks a year for fucking tasteless soup and stupid jewelry for tourists.

or Sharks are…

🌎Since today was my last day in Belize with National Geographic Student Expeditions, I want to share something with you that was instilled in me throughout this trip. I am now a part of the Blue Marbles Project that was started by marine biologist Dr. Wallace J. Nichols. This marble represents what the earth looks like when you’re looking at it from outer space, a blue dot. That dot is filled with an amazing amount of life and unfortunately we are taking it for granted. I earned this marble because I pledge to change  my lifestyle in an attempt to make our earth and oceans a cleaner place for all. If we all participate in some small way we can make this a reality and protect one of the most diverse parts of our biosphere from future destruction.🌎

🌎Since today was my last day in Belize with National Geographic Student Expeditions, I want to share something with you that was instilled in me throughout this trip. I am now a part of the Blue Marbles Project that was started by marine biologist Dr. Wallace J. Nichols. This marble represents what the earth looks like when you’re looking at it from outer space, a blue dot. That dot is filled with an amazing amount of life and unfortunately we are taking it for granted. I earned this marble because I pledge to change my lifestyle in an attempt to make our earth and oceans a cleaner place for all. If we all participate in some small way we can make this a reality and protect one of the most diverse parts of our biosphere from future destruction.🌎

castingshells

castingshells:

Why do we celebrate World Oceans Day?

"To remind everyone of the major part the Ocean has in everyday life. They are the lungs of our planet, providing most of the oxygen we breathe.
To inform the public on the impact of the human actions on the Ocean.
To develop a worldwide movement of citizen, towards the Ocean.
To mobilize and unite the world’s pop ulation on a project for the sustainable management of the World Ocean. They are a major source of food and medicines and a critical part of the biosphere.
To celebrate together the beauty, the wealth and the promise of the Ocean.”

- From the UN article

onefitmodel
alohaei:

lemon-tropica:

a photo i took last year in Tioman x please don’t delete this comment!
when i went to Tioman, we visited this project ‘Tioman Turtles’. they are trying to help save the species of turtles that visit this island from becoming extinct. (this is a small ‘tank’ where a turtle called Jo lives in. She a blind turtle that was rescued c: the poor thing swims around and bumps into the wall :c) anyways, on Tioman there are only 3 species of turtles left that lay their eggs on the beach. because of development (building resorts, tourist attractions etc) the number of turtles that lay their eggs in Tioman are becoming less and less. one of the main threats for baby turtles are humans. we watched a video of a turtle trying to get back to the ocean after laying her eggs, there were these tourists blocking her way. the tourists were trying to take photos with the turtle. this turtle wont come back to lay her eggs there anymore because of the tourists. 
PLEASE REBLOG THIS POST TO HELP SPREAD AWARENESS AND SAVE THE TURTLES!


More tropical posts here ☯✌☼

alohaei:

lemon-tropica:

a photo i took last year in Tioman x please don’t delete this comment!

when i went to Tioman, we visited this project ‘Tioman Turtles’. they are trying to help save the species of turtles that visit this island from becoming extinct. (this is a small ‘tank’ where a turtle called Jo lives in. She a blind turtle that was rescued c: the poor thing swims around and bumps into the wall :c) anyways, on Tioman there are only 3 species of turtles left that lay their eggs on the beach. because of development (building resorts, tourist attractions etc) the number of turtles that lay their eggs in Tioman are becoming less and less. one of the main threats for baby turtles are humans. we watched a video of a turtle trying to get back to the ocean after laying her eggs, there were these tourists blocking her way. the tourists were trying to take photos with the turtle. this turtle wont come back to lay her eggs there anymore because of the tourists. 

PLEASE REBLOG THIS POST TO HELP SPREAD AWARENESS AND SAVE THE TURTLES!

More tropical posts here ☯✌☼